Connect with us

News

The Hell Of Benghazi

Two Of Benghazi’s Secret Soldiers Speak

Story by Frank Jardim • Images courtesy of Paramount Pictures

There’s good reason to see the Paramount blockbuster film 13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi. It’s the true story of a group of six former US military private security contractors who fight with awe inspiring bravery and professionalism to save the lives of their fellow Americans during the September 11-12, 2012 terrorist attacks on the American diplomatic compound and a CIA base (known as the Annex) in Benghazi, Libya. In a battle that eventually took on the feel of a small scale Alamo — odds

They opened a can of all-American whoop-ass on the terrorists

against them may have been higher than 10 to 1 — they steadfastly stuck to their guns, their duty as they saw it, and most importantly, they stuck together as team. They opened a can of all-American whoop-ass on the terrorists, won the firefights and made it possible to evacuate everyone to safety the next morning. A well trained, highly disciplined and motivated American warrior is a force to be reckoned with, and this comes out in the film’s heart pumping battle sequences.

13 Hours: Benghazi
Pablo Schreiber plays Kris “Tanto” Paronto, John Krasinski plays Jack Silva, David Denman plays Dave “Boon” Benton and Dominic Fumusa plays John “Tig” Tiegen in 13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi. 

Another good reason to see 13 Hours is that you probably don’t know what you think you know about how America really protects her interests abroad. The State Department and CIA have their own private security organizations to identify, hire and manage security contractors. Tens of thousands of former American military and law-enforcement personnel work for them in some very dangerous places, even our own former American Shooting Journal executive editor and the web guy was one of them. You hear very little about these contractors because their work in the diplomatic and intelligence communities requires them to keep their mouths shut. That’s how you keep a secret after all.

Bulk Ammo In-Stock

13 Hours: Benghazi2
Pablo Schreiber plays Kris “Tanto” Paronto in 13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi.

It might come as a surprise, but the typical CIA agent isn’t very much like James Bond at all. The guys the CIA hires to protect their agents and staff abroad are the heroes of this story. Those private security contractors are called Global Response Staff (GRS) and they make around $150,000 a year. That may, or may not, be good money depending on your feelings about being killed on the job. Dying is a very real possibility in this line of work. During the battle 13 Hours depicts, two GRS men were killed and another gravely wounded along with a State Department private security contractor (DS).

The man [CIA] in charge of the six GRS operatives, actually held them back for nearly 20 minutes

One thought provoking and disturbing aspect of the story is that the Benghazi attacks could likely have been prevented if the State Department had heeded warnings and beefed up security at the diplomatic compound. It was amazing to me to learn that the security at the front gate and emergency alert responsibility was left in the hands of a few disgruntled Libyan militiamen and three unarmed locally hired Libyan guards. It’s more amazing that nobody there thought that was a problem. The attacking terrorists ran into the compound through the unlocked front gate, and caught the relaxing DS operators completely by surprise. Bear in mind, the attack happened on the anniversary of the most successful terrorist attack on US soil, and nobody bothered to check the gate before turning in for the evening. As a whole, the US State Department comes away from this affair looking complacent and negligently indifferent at its higher levels.

As bad a day as it was for the State Department, the lack of a response from the CIA’s leading agent in Benghazi is comparably appalling. The man who was in charge of the six GRS operatives who tell their story in the film, actually held them back for nearly 20 minutes while terrorists swarmed and burned the diplomatic compound less than two miles away. While the CIA’s Benghazi chief tried by phone to get members of the local Libyan militia to rescue the Americans trapped at the diplomatic compound, two of them died.

It should interest the reader to know that the militia he was calling for help was the same militia that had the responsibility of guarding the compound. The implication is that the CIA chief was deluded and/or misinformed and therefore incompetent.

Ultimately, rather than stand idly by while their fellow Americans were in danger, five GRS operatives at the Annex simply left on their own initiative, without orders or approval, and improvised a rescue at the diplomatic compound as best they could. Had they not done so, it is reasonable to assume American casualties would have been higher.

The hell of Benghazi

The GRS rescue mission to the diplomatic compound was only the beginning of a long night. They drove out the terrorists and fought off a counter attack while searching for the missing ambassador in the burning ruin of his residence. Unfortunately, the ambassador could not be found. Having killed and wounded an unknown number of attackers, they withdrew to the Annex, which the sixth GRS operative had already organized as a defensive base.

They repulsed two terrorist ground attacks

Prudently, the GRS operators had long worked out plans for defending the Annex against siege. Though surrounded by a curtain wall and fortress-like in appearance, they deemed it inadequate for a defense against anything more than AK-47s and a few RPGs. The six GRS operatives, joined by three of the rescued DS security men, took positions on the roof tops of the Annex’s four buildings and on guard towers they’d built against the curtain wall. Everyone else sheltered inside the command post.

They repulsed two terrorist ground attacks on the Annex and inflicted heavy casualties, but not without cost. At the start of the final attack at dawn, the terrorists used a mortar to target the roof of the command post building where two GRS operatives and a DS man were laying down a ferocious fire. The enemy attack was broken, but the mortar barrage left the four men on the rooftop dead or wounded.

I had the honor of interviewing two of the five surviving Benghazi GRS operatives about the film and the battle. Mark “Oz” Geist organized the Annex for defense while his teammate Kris “Tanto” Paronto was part of the five-man group that retook the diplomatic compound. Both men fought off the attacks on the Annex that followed, and Oz was gravely wounded in the final mortar attack.

♠ ♠ ♠ ♠

American Shooting Journal Was there anything that the film 13 Hours left out that you think should have been included in the story?

Co-author of “13 Hours” Mark “Oz” Geist attends the Miami Fan Screening of the Paramount Pictures film “13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi.”

Mark “Oz” Geist We sat down and discussed what should have been in and what shouldn’t, as a group and individuals. I’ve thought about it a lot and there’s not a lot that they could have put in that would make it any better. I really can’t put my finger on any one thing. Of course it would have been great to see more of Max Martini in some of the set up scenes, but that’s more of just a personal thing. He’s playing me, and getting him more screen time would tell more of the lead up to the story. For example, what I was doing out that night [that kept me from participating in the rescue mission to the ambassador’s compound], but that would have slowed down the movie, and I don’t think it would work from a theatrical standpoint. As it is, I don’t think you could have gotten better than what it was.

AmSJ Do you think the film captured the feel of that night?

Kris Paronto attends the Dallas Premier of13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi’.

Kris “Tanto” Paronto Wow. As far as getting emotions down, to me, it did get the emotional effect that we were looking for. Speaking for myself, I was re-living a lot of those emotions that I had that night and in other crisis situations or operations I’ve conducted throughout the years. So that was important. It was basically a 13-hour event that the movie condenses into two. There is some melding of characters, and they had to skip some things, but the important [thing] that I was worried about was that it captured the feelings we had that night. The humor that goes into it — you see a bit of that, and when you read the book. It’s fun. There’s a lot of humor that comes into combat situations. That’s a coping mechanism. You get the great edge, you also get the horror of people dying and body parts hanging off and you also, you know, you get the satisfaction of working with the guys you love working with. All that came through. At least I thought it did. Last night was the first time I sat through the movie with an audience, and I’ll be honest, I didn’t look at their reactions. That wasn’t what I was there for. I don’t know how they reacted to it, but I do know that I react very strongly and emotionally when I see it. If it wasn’t done right, then I would not feel like that. It hurts, but it’s necessary, and I’m glad I feel it. [In] the movie script, they got it right. They got the emotion down.

There’s a lot of humor that comes into combat situations.

AmSJ At the start of the attack on the compound, five of you were waiting in the car at the Annex for the CIA base chief to give the order to go. When you finally just left without orders, I thought to myself, “these guys are fired, they’ll never work again.” When you made the decision to go, did you realize it would end your careers as GRS contractors?

Tanto We really didn’t worry. Put it this way, it’s on your mind a little bit, but saving other people, saving human life, is way too important. Just doing the right thing — and that was the right thing — is more important than a paycheck. When you see the movie, John Krasinski [portraying the GRS operative pseudonymously named Jack Silva] says, “You can’t put a price on human life, you can’t put a price on how you’re gonna live the rest of your life when you could have had the chance to save somebody, and you didn’t because you were worried about your job.” There wasn’t anything that could have kept us from going.

For me, honestly, it was kind of a joke. I thought “Oh well, guess I’m gonna loose my job.” It wasn’t “Ahh shit,” it was more a ‘ha-ha’ trying to be funny sort of thing. And we did loose our jobs, but we still did the right thing. Money comes and goes. Your friends, man when they need you, you gotta go. When they need you in those situations where they are dying, money is nothing. I’ll get another job.

Oz, Tanto and John “Tig” Tiegen attending the Dallas premier.

AmSJ You’ve been pretty critical of your CIA team leader and Annex chief for lack of leadership. What was the crux of the problem?

Oz Our [CIA] team leader didn’t have a military background. He was a full time employee. He was not a contractor. That’s why he didn’t have the same military background that we do. He was the buffer between the knuckle-draggers and the intellects.

Max Martini (left) played Oz in 13 Hours.

 

ASJ You being the knuckle-draggers, right?

Oz Yeah. (Laughs) Us being the knuckle-draggers.

Tanto (Laughs) Good looking knuckle-draggers though [grin].

Oz He just didn’t have the fortitude to step up and do what we thought was right at that time, and make that hard decision. Because being a full-time employee — I’m not making excuses — but a lot of times they just look at things different than we do. We do what we do because we’re out there wanting to make a difference in the world, and I can’t speak to why he does what he does. If we were career-oriented people, we would probably be in a different profession.

Tanto I had issues with the TL [CIA team leader] because I knew him when he first started as team leader, and he was not highly regarded by the operatives because he didn’t have military experience, let alone special operations experience. He came off like a new second lieutenant coming in who was trying to run the enlisted guys who have already been doing it (the job) forever. The reason I got upset with him was because he was going to get beat down in a lot of the places where we were, and I stuck up for him.

It kinda felt like a slap in the face, like hey brother, I went to bat for you, stuck out my neck for you, I’ve known you, I helped mentor you, I’ve worked at some sites before Benghazi and now you aren’t listening to me. I took it a little personally because we had history before Benghazi.

 

ASJ At least he got in the car.

Tanto That’s it. He, yeah, at least he had the guts to get in the car.

Oz The thing is, it would have made him look even worse if he had not and we ended up leaving without him. He would have looked a whole lot worse being stuck there with one thumb in his mouth and the another thumb somewhere else.

AmSJ Among your group of GRS operatives that night, was there a squad leader in the field? It seemed like the other team members entered the compound gate on Tanto’s word that he thought it was clear.

Tanto In that part I said, ‘Hey, just shoot, move and communicate and you’ll be fine.’ Which is lingo for ‘Hey, use your tactics, and we’ll meet somewhere in the middle.’

AmSJ So, basically you did this old school.

Tanto Yeah. (Laughs) We’re old. We’re all old.

Oz Hey, I’m only 50. That doesn’t count. I’m not old, I’m 50 young.

Tanto That’s a tribute to the teams’ maturity level. Tig [John Tiegen] was the youngest. He was 39. The rest of us were in our forties, and had been serving for a while. Yeah, were able to do it up close and on the take without a lot of talk on the radio. Just do your tactics. So, as far as there being a team leader, Rone [Tyrone Woods] was the assistant team leader to our TL for a title. But honestly, we all were either NCOs or officers. Myself, I was both. I was a mustang, enlisted and an officer. We didn’t have one leader per se, we all were leaders. So it wasn’t, ‘Hey this guy [go] do this and this.’ It was if somebody needed to say something, they’d do it, and people would listen.

AmSJ And you didn’t know what you were going to find. You didn’t have a plan other than to go in there and find out what was happening, and see what you could do to save those Americans?

Tanto Yeah

Oz You know, that’s what he talking about when he says, ‘shoot, move and communicate.’ You’re always looking for work when you’re doing that. You’re moving down there [but] you’re not just rushing in blind. You’re just moving as quickly and as tactically as you can, and each person is looking for the dead spot where somebody might be hiding and covering that area. As you go in, second by second you’re just analyzing everything that’s going on before your eyes.
If there’s something you see that needs attention you just take care of it, and then everyone else on the team will react from your actions. This is how we work together. It’s just kind of a free-float teamwork concept.

Tanto We had a term for that in the military. It was called moving and working expeditiously. I had that ingrained in me since basic training. It means you’re moving as fast as the situation allows you to, and still maintain control. That’s what we were doing.

Oz It goes back to the training we have all had from SEALS, Marines, Rangers, etc. It all goes back to that.

AmSJ Thank you gentlemen, or should I say knuckle draggers?

Oz (Laughs)

Tanto (Laughs) AmSJ

The hell of Benghazi

See an interview of Mark Geist with Shawn Ryan of Shawn Ryan Show Podcast former Navy SEAL/CIA Contractor.

Source link: https://americanshootingjournal.com/the-hell-of-benghazi/ by AmSJ Staff at americanshootingjournal.com

(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today)
Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

News

Manage your Hunting Property

It’s terrifying to some, a destructive force that ravages the countryside. However, fire is the best
tool for managing your hunting property when adequately managed.

Using fire to manage land is a technique dating back to when Native Americans freely roamed
our lands. It’s believed that they noticed how the bison and other wildlife grazed heavily on the
fresh sprouts after a burn had occurred due to lightning strikes or it being intentionally set by the
people.

The Benefits of Fire

For thousands of years, fire was the primary way to promote new growth, return nutrients to the
soil, and ensure only the most desirable plants were growing. However, in the last century,
we’ve become scared of fire and rarely use controlled burns to manage our properties.

So we have turned to things like clearing thickets for food plots, spraying, putting out mineral
blocks, and installing corn feeders in the states that allow it. Costing us thousands of dollars a
year, not to mention all the blood, sweat, and tears we pour into hours of working the land.

I’m proposing you save a lot of that money to spend on new camo, 30-30 ammo, or a new deer
stand and use prescribed burning to help keep the wildlife on your land fat and happy.

Below, I’ve gathered some pros of using fire to manage your land.

● Burning is FREE (unless you hire someone to do it)
● Deer, turkey, and many other wild animals thrive after a controlled burn
● Fire allows natural food sources to sprout up, even in places they haven’t been for
decades
● Fire helps some native species sprout and survive
● Fire hurts or kills undesirable species
● Fire is great for pastures and forests
● Prescribed burns reduce the risk of wildfires
● Fire helps restore nutrients to the soil
● Fire improves water quality by allowing more water to gather in the creeks for fish and
other animals to drink instead of being absorbed by shrubs and other non-desirable
species
● Fire helps control the spread of insects such as ticks and some tree diseases

As you can tell, burning has many positives; however, I must also share some of the downsides
of prescribed burning
with you.

The Drawbacks of Fire

While the benefits of using prescribed burns to manage a property far outweigh the drawbacks,
you should still be aware of the cons.

One of the most significant downsides you’ll have to deal with is complaints from your neighbors
about air quality on the day you burn and a few days after. I recommend informing them that
you plan to burn before you begin so some neighbors will understand, but others will complain
no matter what you do.

The most significant danger is that the fire gets out of control because you haven’t burned the
debris before, turning it into a raging inferno. That’s why you should always let your local fire
department know you plan to burn, and you should create fire breaks throughout your property
to burn in smaller chunks and keep things contained.

Though fire can save you a lot of money, planning and executing a burn will take a lot of time.
You’ll likely need some help from friends and family on the day of the burn.

Unlike spraying and planting food plots, seeing the results from burning could take a year or
two. So you’re playing the long game when using prescribed burns to manage your property,
but in the end, it’s well worth it.

● Complaints from neighbors about air quality and danger
● Prescribed burns can get out of control and cause a wildfire when done incorrectly or
carelessly
● Creating a prescribed burning plan and implementing the plan is time-consuming
● Sometimes, it takes a few years to see the positive impact of fire
● Fire needs to be used year after year on pastures and every few years in forests
● The time of year you burn will affect the quality of the burn

Now that you know the drawbacks and benefits of prescribed burns, let’s move on to how to use
fire to improve your land for wildlife.

How to Manage Your Land With Fire

So you’re convinced that using fire is the best way to manage your hunting property but have no
idea where to begin?

Don’t worry; I’ve got you covered! I’ve been burning our property since middle school, and I took
several classes on it in college.

While fire must be respected, it doesn’t have to be a terrifying monster. Let’s break burning your
land down into several simple steps.

  1. Determine Your Goals – The first thing you should do is determine what you wish to accomplish by burning. Do you want to thin out an area to make it easier to hunt, manage some invasive species, or help the native plants produce more food for the animals to eat?
    • Your goals will determine what time of year you should burn, how often you should burn, and how much of your property you should burn. Your entire property doesn’t need to be burned every year. It’s best to have a mix of clearings and thickets.
  2. Create a Prescribed Burning Plan – Once you have set your goals, it’s time to devise a prescribed burning plan. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service, “Burn plans identify – or prescribe – the best conditions under which trees and other plants will burn to get the best results safely. Burn plans consider temperature, humidity, wind, moisture of the vegetation, and conditions for the dispersal of smoke.”
  3. Make the Fire Breaks Now that you have a plan, it’s time to create the fire lines around the area you plan to burn. I always make a fire break along the edge of our property, 10-20 wide, depending on how much fuel (dead leaves, grass, and trees) is on the ground. I’ll follow that up by creating smaller breaks throughout the property to slow down the fire or stop it from reaching the parts of the land I don’t want to be burned. Though it’s not my favorite method, you can create a fire break by discing the ground. However, I usually cut the grass very short and blow all the clippings toward the area that’s getting burned.
  4. Check the Weather – As the time to burn nears, watch the weather closely. It’s impossible to burn in wet conditions, but you also don’t want to burn during the dry season; otherwise, you risk a greater chance of the fire getting out of control. Wind direction and speed are also essential to pay attention to the days before, during, and after the burn.
  5. Burn – Now, the fun part, at least for me. Let the fire department know you’ll be burning that day, and start by lighting the downwind side of your property first. I prefer using a drip torch to light the fire, but I’ve drug old rags soaked in diesel in a pinch. Always have help, water, or a way to put out the fire on hand.
  6. Watch the New Life Flourish – A few days after you burn, you will see new sprouts of grass, trees, and other plants that deer, turkeys, and countless other animals will consume. Many of these plants are very nutritious for animals, and you’ll notice that they’ll quickly find and graze on these new plants.
  7. Hunt – It’s now time to reap the benefits of your labors. By burning your property, you’ll not only see more deer and turkeys, which means you’ll get to be more picky with the ones you harvest, but you’ll also create a habitat in which they can thrive because they’re getting the nutrients, shelter, and water they need.

Parting Shots

Growing up, I was always mesmerized by fire. I loved helping with the burning season on our
small farm and the surrounding farms. However, it wasn’t until college, while obtaining my
wildlife management degree, that I learned how beneficial fire was to wildlife.

Now that you know the incredible benefits of using fire to manage your property, it’s time to
draw up a prescribed burning plan and get to burning!

About the Author
Chris Dwulet is an avid competitive shooter and handloader. He’s also a principle writer for
Ammo.com and runs their Ammunition Guides Podcast on YouTube

Source link: https://americanshootingjournal.com/manage-your-hunting-property/ by AmSJ Staff at americanshootingjournal.com

Continue Reading

Featured

Challenging Judicial Overreach: Conservatives Sound Alarm Over Ruling Granting Gun Rights to Illegal Immigrants

sun-rays-illuminate-people-immigration-blue

A recent federal court ruling in the Northern District of Illinois, granting Second Amendment rights to illegal immigrants, has sparked outrage among conservatives and raised serious concerns about the safety of law enforcement officers. U.S. District Judge Sharon Johnson Coleman’s decision in U.S. v. Carbajal-Flores has far-reaching implications that could undermine federal firearms regulations and jeopardize public safety.

Unpacking the Ruling: Conservative Critique

The ruling, which found that a federal prohibition on illegal immigrants owning firearms is unconstitutional as applied to defendant Heriberto Carbajal-Flores, has drawn sharp criticism from conservatives. Scott Sweetow, a former senior official at the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF), described the decision as “hugely problematic” for law enforcement and highlighted its potential to create chaos in the enforcement of federal firearms laws.

Dividing Opinions: Controversy Surrounding Second Amendment Rights

The case has divided gun rights activists and ignited debate over the boundaries of firearms regulations in light of the landmark 2022 Supreme Court decision in Bruen. While Judge Coleman acknowledged the federal ban on illegal immigrants as “facially constitutional,” she argued that there is no historical tradition of firearm regulation justifying the government’s deprivation of Second Amendment rights from noncitizens with no history of violent crime.

Conservative Concerns: Upholding the Rule of Law

Conservatives view Coleman’s ruling as deeply flawed and illogical, particularly in its potential to prioritize the rights of illegal immigrants over law-abiding citizens. Sweetow highlighted the absurdity of a legal immigrant being denied the right to carry a firearm while an illegal immigrant involved in reckless gun use is granted that privilege. This decision undermines the rule of law and poses a significant challenge to law enforcement agencies tasked with enforcing firearms regulations.

Undermining Federal Regulations: Practical Implications

The practical implications of Coleman’s decision are dire, according to Sweetow. By granting Second Amendment rights to illegal immigrants, the ruling effectively undermines decades of federal firearms regulations, including the 1968 Gun Control Act and subsequent amendments. Law enforcement agencies now face uncertainty in enforcing laws that may be deemed invalid, leading to potential chaos and compromising public safety.

Call for Action: Appealing the Decision

Conservatives argue that Coleman’s ruling must be appealed to prevent further erosion of federal firearms regulations and ensure the safety of communities. Without a successful appeal, prosecuting criminals for firearm possession will become increasingly challenging, casting doubt on the validity of existing laws and creating confusion among law enforcement officials.

Conservatives stand firm in their commitment to upholding the rule of law and protecting the safety of American citizens and law enforcement officers. The decision in U.S. v. Carbajal-Flores represents a dangerous overreach by the judiciary and threatens to undermine the integrity of federal firearms regulations. It is imperative that this ruling be challenged and overturned to prevent further chaos and uphold the principles of justice and public safety.

What do you think of the federal court’s ruling? Leave your thoughts in the comments below. 

Continue Reading

News

Survival Cave Food

You Can’t Eat Bullets…

As gun owners, you understand the importance of being ready for any scenario. While you may have stockpiled guns and ammunition, have you considered the consequences of neglecting to prepare for a food shortage? In today’s world, the looming threat of intentional food supply disruptions orchestrated by the Chinese Communist Party cannot be ignored. Imagine the anxiety of realizing that, despite being armed and ready, you may not be able to feed your family in the event of an emergency. At Survival Cave Food, we recognize these concerns and offer a solution to ensure you’re prepared for any challenge that may arise.

Why Survival Cave Food?

Our commitment to providing the best survival foods is driven by a deep understanding of the uncertainties we face. With the very real possibility of intentional food supply disruptions, relying solely on firearms for protection is not enough. Survival Cave Food offers a range of premium emergency food solutions meticulously crafted to provide long-term sustenance and security for you and your family, even amidst such uncertainties.

A Reliable Source for Your Family's Needs

Survival Cave Food stands as your dependable source for the best survival foods. Our freeze-dried meals and high-quality canned meats are carefully crafted to provide long-term sustenance and security, ensuring your family will have access to essential nutrients, no matter the circumstances. Don’t

let your ammunition be the only thing you stockpile – our products offer a vital solution to ensure your family’s survival in times of crisis.

Supporting Your Preparedness Efforts

As gun owners, you’ve taken steps to protect your loved ones. Now, it’s time to ensure you can sustain them through any challenge. Survival Cave Food aligns with these values, empowering you to take control of your family’s food security. Our products not only offer sustenance but also peace of mind, knowing you’re prepared to face any threat, whether it be intentional disruptions or the aftermath of a crisis.

Made with Care, Trusted by Prepared Patriots

At Survival Cave Food, we take pride in our products, which are made with care and integrity. Our canned meats and freeze-dried meals are not just provisions; they’re essential components of your preparedness plan. Whether you’re stocking up for emergencies, preparing for outdoor adventures, or simply seeking convenient, nutritious options for your family, our products deliver on quality and reliability.

 

Join Us in Securing Your Family's Future

Join countless prepared patriots like yourself who prioritize readiness and security. With Survival Cave Food, you’re not just purchasing survival foods – you’re investing in peace of mind for yourself and your loved ones. Take the first step towards a more secure future by exploring our selection today.

Order Now and Arm Yourself Against Hunger

Don’t let your preparations be incomplete. Take proactive measures to ensure your family’s survival with Survival Cave Food. Explore our range of premium survival foods and experience the peace of mind that comes with being prepared for anything.

Continue Reading

Trending

Copyright © 2024 Guncountry. All Rights Reserved